Our Eve Ambassadors

We’ve got a huge ambition to change the brutal statistics on women’s cancers through raising awareness and funding world-class research in early detection and prevention. We can’t do this alone and that’s why our Eve Ambassadors are so important.

We are lucky enough to have lots of champions raising their voices and awareness with us – women and their families affected by these cancers, the medics and researchers who work on Eve funded programmes, celebrities who are passionate about helping with our mission.

Eve Ambassadors play a critical role in getting the message out there: awareness of gynaecological cancers and funding for research need a step-change and The Eve Appeal is leading the campaign to get every woman able to recognise the signs and symptoms of these cancers and drive up funding to the whole gynaecological cancer research sector.

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Dame Helena Morrissey

Dame Helena Morrissey is Head of Personal Investing within the UK at Legal & General Investment Management, the global fund manager. She also founded the 30% Club, a campaign to get more women into FTSE100 Boards, whilst previously serving as Chair of Trustees for The Eve Appeal.

“I’m so pleased to be involved and support The Eve Appeal, and their mission to seed-fund innovative scientific research in to gynaecological cancers. The charity was set up to save women’s lives by funding leading world-class medical research in prevention and early diagnosis, and the work that they do will ultimately help achieve the vision of a future in which fewer women develop, and more women survive, gynaecological cancers.

“The outcome for women and their families, who have been, or are at risk, of being affected by these cancers – today and in the future – could be vastly different. As a mother of six daughters, that’s something that I’m very passionate about.”

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Laura Coryton - Feminist Campaigner

Laura Coryton is a feminist campaigner fighting to axe tampon tax with the support of over 300,000 activists though change.org/endtampontax. Laura is a politics graduate.

“‘Vagina’. There, I said it. No, it wasn’t a typo and yes, if that worries you then this quote is probably going to make you pretty uncomfortable. But it will be worth it, trust me. For some reason, we totally fear the ‘V’ word and all things associated with female (dare I say it) genitals *shudders*. But let me tell you, there’s plenty more to fear in this world than vaginas. No, really.

“Jokes aside, there’s a serious consequence to shaming women and more specifically, vaginas. Female-specific gynae cancer charities receive a minimal amount of funding and those with such devastating conditions often feel ashamed to talk about them. It’s just not okay. I have struggled with numerous tumours since I was 8, and I couldn’t have faced dealing with misogynistic shame as a consequence. This anxiety simply shouldn’t exist and it’s amazing organisations such as the Eve Appeal that make all the difference in supporting those at their most vulnerable.”

Nimco Ali - Feminist and social activist

Nimco is a feminist and social activist. She is co-founder and director of Daughters of Eve, a survivor-led organisation which has helped to transform the approach to ending female genital mutilation (FGM).

She formerly worked on ‘The Girl Generation: Together to End FGM’ campaign, which celebrates the Africa-led movement to end FGM in one generation

In addition, Nimco is also a founding member of the Women’s Equality Party.

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Cherry Healey - TV presenter

Best know for her hugely successful and immersive BBC3 documentaries, and her hilarious and candid momoir about twenty-first-century womanhood Letters to my Fanny; Cherry is on a mission to help spread awareness of gynae cancers:

Gynaecological cancers have such a low profile, in part I think because of the embarrassment and shame that existing around female genitalia. Many girls learn to feel ashamed of their vaginas, breasts and genitalia and as a result know very little about their anatomy. And if we don’t know our vagina from our vulva and what’s normal and not for us, then it will be much harder to spot the potential signs of gynaecological cancer.

As a woman and a mother, I feel we need to be as open and honest with each other about, and with our daughters, about our bodies as we can: understand our bodies, talk about sexual, reproductive and gynaecological health, to gradually break down the myths and taboos that still exist around the female anatomy. My hope is that women will come to know their bodies better than a black cab driver knows The Knowledge.”

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Enda Brady - Sky News Correspondent

Enda Brady is a Sky News Correspondent based in London. He has interviewed everyone from Hollywood stars like Angelina Jolie and Jennifer Lawrence to sports stars like Pelé, Tiger Woods and David Beckham.

He has run 11 marathons so far and in 2016 ran the London Marathon for The Eve Appeal.

“My mother survived breast cancer because she was very fortunate to get an early diagnosis. Then I saw the statistics for ovarian cancer and I was horrified. I was shocked that so many women are not getting the same fighting chance,

“So much more needs to be done in the fight against women’s cancers. More research, more awareness, more fundraising. I’m proud to be an official ambassador for The Eve Appeal.”

 

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Helen Lederer - Actress and Comedian

Helen Lederer is a writer and comedy actress, having begun her career in the 80’s at London’s Comedy store. She is perhaps best known for her role as the dippy Catriona in Absolutely Fabulous, however, to others she’s known for her unique brand of wit and observational humour. A  comedy writer with a portfolio that includes writing and performing her own material, radio comedies, articles and more recently her comedy novel ‘Losing it’, Helen has also appeared in many TV comedies and the West End.

“Any cancer is devastating, but hidden cancers are the worst, as they often have a bad outcome. Gynaecological cancers come into this category and anything that helps early detection and cure has to be a cause worth fighting for. That is why I’m so proud to help raise awareness for The Eve Appeal and their work.”

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Dr Monah Mansoori - GP and Health Expert

Dr Monah Mansoori is a GP and Health Expert who regularly appears on the likes of Sky News, BBC News and ITV’s This Morning debating key health issues and stories.

“As a doctor I see the devastating effects of gynaecological cancers on women and their families first hand.

Although we have come a long way in the treatment and survival rates in some areas we still have a very long way to go, specifically in the area of early detection.

Picking up a cancer early can mean the difference between a complicated treatment versus a simpler solution and in the grand scheme of things- between life and death.

The Eve appeal is a particularly special charity as it addresses both funding for the science behind improving outcomes and earlier detection as well as educating women and health workers on how to improve pickup rates. Part of this is tackling the stigma of talking about gynaecological problems more openly.

There is hope for the future, and together we can make a difference.”

 

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Caroline Hirons - Beauty and Skincare Expert

Caroline is a beauty and skincare expert who has been in retail for over 30 years, and working as a consultant to brands in the beauty industry for over 10 years, advising brands on the route into market, where they should be selling and why.

The Eve Appeal is a very important charity and I’m thrilled to be working as an Ambassador. It’s a subject very close to my heart, as when I was 16 years old my family lost our beloved Grandmother to cervical cancer.

“Gynaecological cancers are so easily forgotten and my hope as an ambassador is that we will be able to reach out to women everywhere and get them talking about these cancers”.